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Ah, Canada.

Home of poutine, maple syrup, hockey, and….marijuana.


Some of the most highly coveted strains in the world are (apparently) found here in British Columbia. And finally, after Harper’s “War on Drugs” admitted crushing defeat, our Government is ready to rake in the dough from what will likely become one of Canada’s most profitable sectors: the sale of government regulated cannabis.

Of course news that Canada will finally be legalizing and regulating the sale of marijuana has received mixed reactions. Generally, though, the feedback has been positive. Taking marijuana out of the hands of drug dealers and instead putting it in the pockets of politicians seems like an excellent idea – right?

But on a more serious note, the legalization of marijuana brings forward a myriad of other issues. One of the most concerning topics is how police will combat drug-impaired drivers. Currently, police are permitted to conduct Standardized Field Sobriety Tests if they suspect a driver is drug-impaired. If the police do believe the person is drug impaired, a doctor monitored blood test must be conducted. Due to a lack of resources, it is often not practicable for police to transport the suspect to the hospital for such testing. As a result, these matters are generally less likely to be prosecuted.

Let’s be realistic: it is highly unlikely that anyone has been refraining from marijuana use while awaiting news of legalization. While we may see increased use over all due to the fact that certain retailers will be licensed to sell marijuana (think Shoppers Drug Mart and London Drugs), the fact of the matter is that people have been driving stoned for years – but the legalization of marijuana is likely to put more stoned drivers on the road. Our government is prepared to fight back by implementing new legislation that gives the police more authority to test suspected drug-impaired drivers roadside. Here’s the proposal:

  • Allow police to demand oral samples at roadside from suspected drug-impaired. An instrument similar to an Approved Screening Device is currently being manufactured and tested;
  • Allow police to proceed with a drug recognition evaluation or blood sample in circumstances where they have reasonable grounds to believe that an offence has occurred.
  • Allow police to provide opinion evidence in Court regarding their belief that a driver was impaired by a drug at the time of testing. No expert opinion from an external source would be required. This eases the burden on the prosecution to prove the elements of an offence.

Keeping our roadways safe is something every single person, motorist or pedestrian, can get behind. In doing so, however, it is important that we uphold the values contained in our Charter – i.e. no motorist should be arbitrarily detained, which could be a direct result of a simple traffic stop turned drug-impaired investigation if this new legislation succeeds through Parliament. Police officers are not, by virtue of their employment, drug recognition experts. That knowledge comes from medical training which is obtained through intensive study under skilled professionals.

If the proposed legislation does succeed it will be scrutinized through various Charter challenges, prompting amendments to the legislation. It will likely fare similar to how the IRP regime was, and still is, highly criticized by many professionals.

If you are pulled over and police suspect you are under the influence of marijuana or any other drug, the first thing you should do is remember your right to silence. The only exceptions to the silence rule:

  • Identify yourself upon request;
  • Request to phone 604-278-0555 and speak with David Tarnow or Jason Tarnow.

Our firm is highly skilled in dealing with impaired (alcohol or drug) driving cases. While it may seem like an “open and shut case” with the evidence stacked against you, this area of law is extremely complex and requires the attention of a seasoned criminal defence lawyer. With over 50 years combined experience, the lawyers at Tarnow Law Offices have the knowledge and strategies to help you through this incredibly stressful time.

We are conveniently located in Richmond, B.C. only a few steps away from Brighouse Station on the Canada Line, which brings you from various locations in Metro Vancouver in 20 minutes. We service all areas of the lower mainland (including but not limited to Surrey, New Westminster, Port Coquitlam, North Vancouver, and Abbotsford) the interior of B.C. (including but not limited to Cranbrook, Kelowna, Kamloops, and Salmon Arm), Northern B.C. (including but not limited to Prince George, Prince Rupert, and Quesnel) and in the Yukon Territory where we offer services in Whitehorse, Dawson City, and Old Crow.

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